There was a story in the news today where a student at Bristol University accidentally created triacetone triperoxide (TATP) which was former during another experiment. The place needed to be evacuated and the Bomb squad brought in. Reminds me of High School. Our Chemistry  teacher Mr Linderman was out ill and we had a substitute teacher who was there to monitor the class as we finished up some experiments we were working on. A couple of friends and I decided to try and make some contact explosive, like the little 'snap' things you throw around the 4th of July.  We had one of the girls go ask the sub for the iodide which was locked up. Obviously the sub was oblivious and did it without question as others were asking for various elements and liquids for their experiments.  We mixed up a smal batch of Nitrogen Triiodide  NI3  WARNING: DO NOT TRY THIS AT HOME very dangerous. . It needs to dry and become crystal form but we didn;t want to make it to obvious, so we spread it out on top of a bunch of wax paper in petri dishes. We weren't sure if it was going to work. It was the last class of the day, so we left it on the counter. Next morning, the teacher opened the door and just the draft and breeze from opening the door set off a chin reaction on the counter-tops and shattered a bunch of beakers s, not to mention made a large boom which caused the History Teacher Mr Harstad to hit the deck. He was a war vet who still experienced shell-shock from sudden noises. We were in his class first period. Over the loudspeaker, we were summed to the office and reprimanded. did I mention one of my friends was the teachers son. Be careful mixin chemicals if you dont know exactly what you're doing.   Check out the video and see how unstable this stuff is, which we had no idea. We didn't have computers back then in 1979. Really. Reminder: DO NOT TRY THIS AT HOME